iPod Shuffle May 2016

  • Keep It To Yourself : Amy Rigby
  • Pennies from Heaven : Billie Holiday
  • Cocaine Blues : Rambling Jack Elliott
  • Blue Spirit Blues : Bessie Smith
  • Let’s Fall in Love : Spike Robinson & George Masso
  • Stepping Back In Time : Liz Simcock
  • Jennifer Lawrence : Girlboy
  • The Times You’ve Come : Jackson Browne
  • Falling In Love Again : Billie Holiday
  • Anthropology : Art Pepper

A pretty good shakedown, I think, beginning with one of several very fine songs written and recorded by Amy Rigby, comparatively little-known in this country and last heard of living in the Hudson Valley with Reckless Eric. In a small attempt to rectify this, here’s some basic info from her web site …

Amy Rigby is a songwriter, musician and performer best known for her album Diary Of A Mod Housewife and Little Steven’s Underground Garage favorite track “Dancing With Joey Ramone”. She was part of the late 70’s downtown NYC no wave nightspot Tier 3 gang and formed bands the Stare Kits, Last Roundup and The Shams before beginning her solo career. For the last twenty years she has toured the US, Canada, UK and Europe, appearing on Fresh Air with Terry Gross, Late Night with Conan O’Brien, World Cafe, Whad’Ya Know, All Things Considered, BBC Radio 6 Music’s Marc Riley Show and Mountain Stage.

and here’s Amy doing the song live …

Two Billie Holiday tracks have to be better than one. Pennies was recorded in 1936 with a Teddy Wilson group including Benny Goodman on clarinet and Ben Webster on tenor, and Falling in 1940 with Sonny White on piano and Roy Eldridge on trumpet.

The Bessie Smith track, one of her best, I think, was recorded in 1929 with James P. Johnson on piano. There are quite a few mentions of Bessie in August Wilson’s play, Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, currently at the National Theatre. Rainey was happy to be known as the Mother of the Blues, as opposed to her only significant rival, Bessie Smith, who claimed the title Empress off the Blues. As Paul Oliver and Giles Oakley point out in their essays in the  NT programme, the younger and more glamorous Bessie was more appreciated in Chicago and the cities of the North, to which many  black Americans had migrated in the early years of the twentieth century, whereas Rainey retained the bulk of her following in the more traditionally minded South.

What else? Girlboy are Hayley Hill & Matthew Blake, an electrohop (their description) duo from San Diego and their sexy and slightly subversive song in praise of the many charms of actress Jennifer Lawrence has rarely been out of my various self-selected playlists since I first heard it played by Tom Robinson on Radio 6 Music. [Is it still called that?] Catchy as all-get-out.

The Art Pepper track I’m especially fond of as it has Pepper playing clarinet, an instrument  on which he has a beautiful tone but on which he comparatively rarely recorded. I was thinking about Art Pepper recently when watching the first series of Bosch, in which Titus Welliver plays Michael Connelly’s LA police detective Harry Bosch; it’s clear from the novels that Connelly is a big Pepper fan and I was a little disappointed that the soundtrack, even in the scenes when Bosch is alone in his apartment, was devoid not just of any Pepper but anything distinctively jazz-like, but then, in the final episode, there’s a sequence in which Bosch’s teenage daughter comes to visit and he puts a Pepper track on the stereo – Patricia, which Pepper wrote for the daughter that he, like Bosch – though for different reasons – saw all too little of.

 

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2 thoughts on “iPod Shuffle May 2016

  1. How on earth can you dramatize Harry Bosch and have no jazz or Art Pepper?

    Serendipitously within a couple of hours of reading this post I was reading Nick Coleman’s touching memoir “The Train In The Night” (which someone gave me last week) and came upon a passage where he describes his difficult relationship with his blind, troubled, clarinet playing father in law and, in particular, turning him on to Art Pepper…..

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