Elder Begins …

Frank Elder first saw the light of day – in print, that is – in a short story called “Due North”, which was first published in Crime in the City, edited by Martin Edwards (The Do Not Press, London, 2002) It was reprinted in The Best British Mysteries, edited by Maxim Jakubowski (Allison & Busby, London, 2003) and collected in A Darker Shade of Blue, (William Heinemann, London, 2010). It’s currently available in an Arrow paperback.

Darker

This is how it starts …

Elder hated this: the after-midnight call, the neighbours penned back behind hastily unravelled tape, the video camera’s almost silent whir; the way, as if reproachful, the uniformed officers failed to meet his eye; and this especially, the bilious taste that fouled his mouth as he stared down at the bed, the way the hands of both children rested near the cover’s edge, as if at peace, their fingers loosely curled.

Of course, there is no peace. Certainly not for Elder, even though by the end of the story that’s what, in desperation and despair, he’s seeking, leaving his wife, Joanne; his eleven year old daughter, Katherine [“eleven going on twenty-four”]; leaving Nottingham and travelling about as far west in the country as it is possible to go, the Penwith peninsula, deep into Cornwall on the road to Land’s End.

There, brief and unsatisfactory visits back to visit his family aside, he stays until in her teens Katherine seeks him out herself and another sad chapter of their story begins.

From his position atop the rough stone wall, Elder tracked the progress of the bus as it trailed around the road’s high curve, the rough-hewn moor above, the fertile bottom land below. Today the sky was shade on shade of blue, and palest where it curved to meet the sea, the horizon a havering trick of light on which the outline of a large boat, a tanker, seemed to have been stuck like an illustration from a child’s book. Elder knew there would be lobster boats, two or three, checking their catch close in against the cliff and out of sight from where he stood.

He watched as the bus stopped and Katherine got down, standing for a moment till the bus had pulled away, a solitary figure by the road’s edge and, at that distance, barely recognisable to the naked eye. Even so, he knew it was her; the turn of her head, the way she stood.

With a quick movement, Katherine hoisted her rucksack on to one shoulder, hitched it into position and crossed the road towards the top of the lane that would bring her, eventually, down to the cottage where Elder lived.

Dropping from the wall, he hurried across the field.

That’s from chapter two of Flesh & Blood, originally published by William Heinemann in 2004, and just reissued by Arrow Books in a paperback version designed to match the new and fourth Elder novel, Body & Soul, which has a similar beginning; only Katherine is now in her early twenties and sorely troubled, seeking something – solace? answers? – from her father that he finds it close to impossible to provide.

Flesh & Blood is published today, March 1st, and this month is available as a Kindle Monthly Deal at 99p. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Flesh-Blood-Frank-John-Harvey-ebook/dp/B004ZLS2WS/ref=sr_1_359?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1519892042&sr=1-359

Body & Soul is published by William Heinemann on April 19th.

F&B 1

B & S Front

 

 

 

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