“Going Down Slow”

Once upon a time – 2009, to be exact – there was Minor Key, a nicely put together limited edition hardback published by Five Leaves of Nottingham and containing five short stories, half a dozen poems and an introductory essay, “Resnick, Nottingham and All That  Jazz”.

 

SLOW cover

Well, now the good folk at Five Leaves are set to publish something in the way of a sequel: Going Down Slow & Other Stories – seven previously uncollected short stories in a limited edition hardback with a run of 1000 copies, the first 100 of which will be numbered and signed. Publication date is Tuesday, 14th November and there will be a launch event at Five Leaves Bookshop between 7.00 & 8.30pm that evening. Admission is free, but, as anyone who’s been to the shop will know, space is limited, so if you’re thinking of going along, best to RSVP to events@fiveleaves.co.uk or risk being shut outside, looking in, with only the occasional punter heading for the betting shop next door for company.

As you’ll see from the cover, there’s a bit of a retro thing going on: retro-noir; retro-hard boiled detective; retro-fedora. Which is the title of one of the stories – “Fedora” – the story that was awarded the CWA Short Story Dagger in 2014. It’s a Jack Kiley story – as are “Second Chance” and “Dead Dames Don’t Sing”, the latter a tale of rare books, rarer manuscripts and pulp fiction that first appeared in the Bibliomysteries series published by Otto Penzler’s New York-based Mysterious Bookshop.

Kiley, for those who haven’t previously made his acquaintance, was formerly an officer in the Met, as well as, briefly, a professional footballer, and is currently eking out a living as a private detective in North London – hence the fedora, given to him by his friend Kate as a kind of joke. Joke or not, he wears it well.

Along the three Kileys, there are two Nottingham-based stories featuring Charlie Resnick – “Not Tommy Johnson” and the title story, “Going Down Slow” – and a third Nottingham story, “Ask Me Now”, a companion piece to “Sack O’Woe”, which first appeared in a Mystery Writers of America anthology, The Blue Religion, edited by Michael Connelly.  And if you’ve been counting you’ll know that leaves one more: “Handy Man”, a rare, for me, exercise in writing in the first person, female first person at that, which takes off from the excellent Amy Rigby song, “Keep It To Yourself”.

If you can’t get along to the launch in Nottingham, but live down south, on the Monday of the week following, the 20th, I shall be at the Owl Bookshop in Kentish Town with the writer Woody Haut, to celebrate the publication of his novel, Days of Smoke, and to talk about both that book and Going Down Slow. And just to round things off, on Friday 24th, 6.30 – 7.30pm, I’m reading with the John Lake Band at a Ray’s Jazz event at Foyles Bookshop in Charing Cross Road. Mostly poetry on this occasion, but I’m sure the short stories will sneak in there somewhere.

And should you want to pre-order a copy [there are only 1,000, remember] you can do so from the Five Leaves Bookshop bookshop@fiveleaves.co.uk / 0115 837 3097. Price £12.99 post free in the UK.

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iPod Shuffle, September 2017

On what is, apparently, the first official day of Autumn, this is what my iPod came up with this morning, as I was walking to the Royal Free Hospital for a routine blood test …

Jarrett

Meshell

  1. A Song For You : Dusty Springfield, from Something Special
  2. When Your Lover Has Gone : Ray Charles, from The Genius of Ray Charles
  3. What You Came Here to Do : Girlboy, from Late Bloomers
  4. Keep it to Yourself : Amy Rigby, from 18 Again
  5. A Bitter Mule : Me’Shell Ndegeocello, from Weather
  6. Prelude & Fugue No. 10 in C Minor : Keith Jarrett, from Shostakovich 24 Preludes & Fugues
  7. My Romance : Warne Marsh, from A Ballad Album
  8. Teachers : Leonard Cohen, from The Songs of Leonard Cohen
  9. Baby Took a Limo to Memphis : Guy Clarke, from Dublin Blues
  10. The Last Campaign Trilogy : John Stewart, from The Complete Phoenix Concerts
  11. Two Pianos : John Tilbury & Phillip Thomas, from Morton Feldman, Two Pianos & Other Pieces, 1953-1969
  12. Ad Lib Blues : Lester Young, from The President Plays

Stewart

Feldman

iPod Shuffle May 2016

  • Keep It To Yourself : Amy Rigby
  • Pennies from Heaven : Billie Holiday
  • Cocaine Blues : Rambling Jack Elliott
  • Blue Spirit Blues : Bessie Smith
  • Let’s Fall in Love : Spike Robinson & George Masso
  • Stepping Back In Time : Liz Simcock
  • Jennifer Lawrence : Girlboy
  • The Times You’ve Come : Jackson Browne
  • Falling In Love Again : Billie Holiday
  • Anthropology : Art Pepper

A pretty good shakedown, I think, beginning with one of several very fine songs written and recorded by Amy Rigby, comparatively little-known in this country and last heard of living in the Hudson Valley with Reckless Eric. In a small attempt to rectify this, here’s some basic info from her web site …

Amy Rigby is a songwriter, musician and performer best known for her album Diary Of A Mod Housewife and Little Steven’s Underground Garage favorite track “Dancing With Joey Ramone”. She was part of the late 70’s downtown NYC no wave nightspot Tier 3 gang and formed bands the Stare Kits, Last Roundup and The Shams before beginning her solo career. For the last twenty years she has toured the US, Canada, UK and Europe, appearing on Fresh Air with Terry Gross, Late Night with Conan O’Brien, World Cafe, Whad’Ya Know, All Things Considered, BBC Radio 6 Music’s Marc Riley Show and Mountain Stage.

and here’s Amy doing the song live …

Two Billie Holiday tracks have to be better than one. Pennies was recorded in 1936 with a Teddy Wilson group including Benny Goodman on clarinet and Ben Webster on tenor, and Falling in 1940 with Sonny White on piano and Roy Eldridge on trumpet.

The Bessie Smith track, one of her best, I think, was recorded in 1929 with James P. Johnson on piano. There are quite a few mentions of Bessie in August Wilson’s play, Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, currently at the National Theatre. Rainey was happy to be known as the Mother of the Blues, as opposed to her only significant rival, Bessie Smith, who claimed the title Empress off the Blues. As Paul Oliver and Giles Oakley point out in their essays in the  NT programme, the younger and more glamorous Bessie was more appreciated in Chicago and the cities of the North, to which many  black Americans had migrated in the early years of the twentieth century, whereas Rainey retained the bulk of her following in the more traditionally minded South.

What else? Girlboy are Hayley Hill & Matthew Blake, an electrohop (their description) duo from San Diego and their sexy and slightly subversive song in praise of the many charms of actress Jennifer Lawrence has rarely been out of my various self-selected playlists since I first heard it played by Tom Robinson on Radio 6 Music. [Is it still called that?] Catchy as all-get-out.

The Art Pepper track I’m especially fond of as it has Pepper playing clarinet, an instrument  on which he has a beautiful tone but on which he comparatively rarely recorded. I was thinking about Art Pepper recently when watching the first series of Bosch, in which Titus Welliver plays Michael Connelly’s LA police detective Harry Bosch; it’s clear from the novels that Connelly is a big Pepper fan and I was a little disappointed that the soundtrack, even in the scenes when Bosch is alone in his apartment, was devoid not just of any Pepper but anything distinctively jazz-like, but then, in the final episode, there’s a sequence in which Bosch’s teenage daughter comes to visit and he puts a Pepper track on the stereo – Patricia, which Pepper wrote for the daughter that he, like Bosch – though for different reasons – saw all too little of.