iPod Shuffle, January 2017

So, these tracks are the ones that bounced up into the headphones, accompanying me on my Heathside stroll …

  • Girl From the North Country : Bob Dylan & Johnny Cash
  • Time After Time : Miles Davis
  • Kathy’s Song : Paul Simon
  • Line Up : Lennie Tristano
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  • Standing at the Crossroads : Johnny Shines
  • Carolina Shout: James P. Johnson
  • Four Bothers : Anita O’Day
  • My Creole Belle : Mississippi John Hurt
  • When Will I See You Again : Billy Bragg
  • Winter Lady : Leonard Cohen
  • East 32nd : Lennie Tristano
  • Crazy Man Michael : Fairport Convention
  • Yours and Mine : Billie Holiday
  • She’s Crazy ’bout Her Lovin’ : Mississippi Sheiks
  • Suite Italienne 1 – Larghetto (Stravinsky) : Victoria Mullova & Katia Labeque
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  • Streets of Baltimore : Gram Parsons
  • Then Came the Children : Pail Siebel
  • Juke : Little Walter
  • Wasn’t Born to Follow : Dusty Springfield
  • Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting : Al Fair-weather & Sandy Brown’s All Stars
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Katia Labeque & Victoria Mullova in Rehearsal

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Billy Bragg & Joe Henry, Shining a Light, Keeping Track …

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It wasn’t a bad night [though that came, and with a vengeance, later]. Billy Bragg and Joe Henry at the Union Chapel in north London, the second night of the UK leg of their Shine a  Light tour, which began in Nashville, Tennessee and will finish, after appropriate breaks, in Melbourne, Australia. A tour about a tour.

It began in back in March when the two musicians, plus a little recording equipment, plus guitars, boarded a train in Chicago and began a journey that would take them south and then west across the United States, stopping at St. Louis, Poplar Bluff, Fort Worth, San Antonio, Alpine, El Paso and Tucson on the way. Some 2,728 miles of track. And here and there along the way, they would find a waiting room or similar space in which to record a song. A song that, in one way or another, was inspired by the rails, boxcars, the iron horse, the lonely whistle of a freight train passing through the night. Train songs, folk songs, Leadbelly songs.

Two men with a couple of guitars each and an upright piano standing off stage right. Henry’s voice is the higher, distinctive, slightly nasal; Bragg’s, a deeper baritone, takes on an American tone. [An American tune.] Two of the first three songs – Railroad Bill & John Henry – I know well from my own fledgling skiffle group days,  as, it transpires, does my companion for the evening – jazz aficionado and crime writing critic and commentator [I like to refer to him as the thinking man’s Barry Forshaw – sorry, Barry!] – Bob Cornwell. Bob shared with me, as I discovered in the interval, the distinction of having played single string tea chest bass in a youthful, enthusiastic and, by the sound of it,not overly successful skiffle group in our teenage years. Both of our initial public appearances seem to have ended precipitously with a request to pack up our things and leave the building. No matter, those songs brought it all back in its dubious glory – as, later on, did The Midnight Special and, of course, Rock Island Line.

While we were talking about this that Bob raised the name of Lonnie Donegan, not quite the first but certainly the most famous British skiffler, saying that he thought Donegan had never quite got his due. It was a point taken up strongly by Bragg during the second half, when he mentioned a book he has just finished writing which marks Donegan’s recording of Rock Island Line – the first record to top the UK charts featuring someone singing and playing guitar – as the major turning point in popular music; where previously it had been, to a greater or lesser degree, based on or around jazz and jazz instrumentation, from hereon it, it would be about guitars.

In addition to the songs they performed together, each man played a short solo set, Henry taking to the piano for a Randy Newman-influenced This Was My Country [painfully prophetic in the light of what was to come through the early hours of the morning, but leavened by hope nonetheless] and finishing with a beautiful and deeply felt version of Alain Toussaint’s Freedom For The Stallion. Unsurprisingly, Bragg, digging into his back list for  Accident Waiting to Happen and There is Power in a Union, voice reverting to its London twang, was the more directly political, pointing up the links between Brexit and what was happening politically in America, and drawing a clear connection, via Woody Guthrie, between the treatment meted out to the Okies when they left the dustbowl in the 30s and headed out to California looking for work and a better life for their children and what was being done to refugees in various parts of Europe on our behalf.

We stepped out into the night knowing we’d experienced something special. The UK leg of the tour takes a break two-thirds of the way through November, picks up again in January. You can find the details here …

If they come near you, try not to miss out.

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iPod Shuffle, November 2016

 

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  • Trouble in the Fields, Nanci Griffith
  • Wooly Bully, Sam the Sham & the Pharoahs
  • At Long Last Love, Frank Sinatra
  • Respect, Aretha Franklin
  • When an Old Cricketer Leaves the Crease, Roy Harper
  • I Can’t Get Started, Billie Holiday
  • Thirteen, Kathryn Williams
  • The Glow Worm, The Mills Brothers
  • No Name Blues, Johnny Shines
  • Subterranean Homesick Blues, Bob Dylan [Take 1, Alternate Take]
  • Brilliant Mistake, Elvis Costello
  • Way Over Yonder in the Minor Key, Billy Bragg & Wilco

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